City must protect our citizens and environment from developers

Destroying our natural environment and replacing it with concrete jungles, in my estimation at least, can in no way be called progressive development. The cosy relationship between our local government structures and the Western Cape Developers Forum, where red carpet treatment ensures the big developers easy passage to encroach on the urban edge, where zoning rules are amended to allow more units for profit and where the seemingly insatiable mammonic greed is fed.

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Suspicion over bid to save stadium

I am concerned that the City wants to cover up its wastage, and protect themselves from the blame of misspending. It’s going to be difficult to make the stadium commercially viable, and at the end of the day, the ratepayers will still foot the bill no matter how you look at it.

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Video: Cape Sewage Outrage

Aerial photographs of the oceans around the Southern tip of the continent went viral earlier this year causing outrage. The images showed that the City of Cape Town was pumping 55 million litres of untreated sewage into Table Bay every day. New scientific analysis now reveals that 87 000 carcinogenic, hormone disrupting chemicals could be seeping from the sewage mass into the oceans. Yet, the city is without any immediate solutions. Carte Blanche investigates the far-reaching impact of the filth.

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Opinion: Bad development bid

We were also treated to a glossy presentation showing splashing whales and a boardwalk (a good idea), but no images of the 40-odd “exclusive” houses and shops to be squashed on to this precious site. He proved that our council has done zero consultation with the people who actually use Maiden’s Cove, the historically disadvantaged communities of the Cape Flats.

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GCTCA Annual Chairman’s Report August 2015

It would appear that the voice of the ratepayer is being silenced by the new municipal bylaw on planning (MBL). Regulation will allow developments to be approved without consultation with the ratepayers and community. A closer study of the MBL reveal quite wide ranging powers given to the City to exclude public participation, e.g the City can decide whom it feels would be appropriate to consult. This means it could bypass the local ratepayer and civic organisations thus denying organised community structures a voice.

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Budget Blues for city ratepayers

Cape Town should be run as a proper business and this is what we the shareholders (ratepayers) demand.

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Cape Town rates and tariff increases excessive – Cape Chamber

City’s 27 000 staff are earning an average of R30 000 a month in salaries and benefits, well above private sector norms.

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GCTCA responds to city’s exorbitant proposed tariff increases

The Greater Cape Town Civic Alliance (GCTCA) hereby vigorously objects to the exorbitant proposed increases and demands that it be reduced to be in line with the current inflation rate of less than 5%. We also suggest that in view of the already approved Eskom increase, the City of Cape Town should REDUCE its CURRENT 10% SURCHARGE on electricity to alleviate the heavy impact thereof on its residents.

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No green light yet for Uitkamp in Durbanville

“The land is agricultural land and it remains under the jurisdiction of the national minister of agriculture. No provincial or City approvals can supersede his and the national department’s authority over the land. The developer still needs approvals from both the national departments of agriculture and water affairs – any local authorisations granted cannot in isolation be wrenched from the rest of the legislative processes,”

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City of Cape Town in clash over wine farm housing project

THE Constantia community is to take the City of Cape Town to court after it gave the green light for a housing development to be built on a grade one heritage wine farm in Constantia’s famed valley of the vines.

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Recent development decisions make mockery of city’s bid to be a bioregion

Van der Merwe’s letter is typical of the “we know best” attitude of those inhabiting the Cape Town Civic Centre, perfectly illustrated in the first sentence of his second paragraph in which the concerns of residents are the last consideration mentioned, though it is they who put the politicians in power.

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Centralised decisions destroying the City’s natural resources

The current Cape Town structure and the power vested solely in the position of the executive mayor and Mayco (her mayoral committee) has embraced this form of government, with its dictatorial, centralised control.

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Hear the people!

We know those in power place a priority on “economic; growth”, but economic development must be to uplift people and take care of our natural surroundings and environment, not increase the wealth and power of the already rich.

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City approves Noordhoek Restaurant despite tide of public objection

“Ten or 15 years ago this may have been different, but now there is very much top-down decision-making. We hoped democracy would have evolved to allow civil society to become a more respected and involved party in decision-making, which is good governance, but that has not happened,”

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Planning by-law rattles ratepayers

Questions have been raised about the constitutionality of Cape Town’s draft municipal planning by-law, the lack of public participation and the centralisation of power in the mayor’s office to deal with appeals.

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Princess Vlei gets World Design Capital seal

The forum, which was formed to fight city council plans to allow a shopping mall and taxi rank in one of the few green lungs on the Cape Flats, said their project was to transform the land around the vlei into an urban nature park.

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